Understand what the statute of limitations means for your case

Understand what the statute of limitations means for your case

| Dec 29, 2020 | Motor Vehicle Accidents |

In Nevada, you have the option of filing a personal injury claim up to two years after an injury happens. For example, if you’re involved in a serious car crash, you might be focused on your health initially, but once you are stable and ready to make a claim, many months may have passed. The good news is that you can start your claim at any time within the two years after your injuries happened, but you do need to be cautious not to miss that window.

If you miss the window for your claim, it is almost guaranteed that you won’t be able to make a claim. However, there may be exceptions, so if you’re very close to that window or have extenuating circumstances, it may be worth speaking with your attorney about the possibility of still making your case.

Why is there a statute of limitations in Nevada?

A statute of limitations is designed to limit the maximum amount of time someone has to make a claim. This helps protect the defendant against claims that happen many years following an incident, giving them an opportunity to move on if the other party decides not to claim within a reasonable time frame.

The statute of limitations is also there because of the potential for evidence to go missing or be lost and for people to have lapses in their memories of a specific incident. Statutes of limitations have been used in law for a long time, and they are set for almost any kind of case today.

How soon should you file a claim if you are hurt?

It is a good idea to make it known that you want to file a claim as soon as possible. You can call your attorney or have them meet you at the hospital to discuss your case and how to begin your claim.

It’s important not to settle your claim too early, but you can always start your claim as soon as you want. You can provide additional receipts and documents to the insurance company to show your expenses as you receive them. Your attorney will also help you show past, current and future financial losses from this incident.